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stereoculturesociety:

CultureHISTORY: Juneteenth Day 2014 *Sepia Visions*

Happy Juneteenth! The day we got free. Some also call it “Emancipation Day”. On June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger, along with 2,000 federal troops, arrived in Galveston, Texas, and read the following statement:

"The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, ALL SLAVES ARE FREE.”

More on Juneteenth history here. Photo credits where available below.

  1. Slaves. Unknown plantation c. 1860s
  2. 1862 Smith’s Plantation, Beaufort County, SC
  3. Two runaway slaves c. 1862-1863
  4. Civil War Union soldier and his family
  5. Two ex-slaves c. 1900s

HISTORY! NEVER FORGET!

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heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

NEVER FORGET!

heytoyourmamanem:

"The white chillen tries teach me to read and write but I didn’ larn much, ‘cause I allus workin’. Mother was workin’ in the house, and she cooked too. She say she used to hide in the chimney corner and listen to what the white folks say. When freedom was ‘clared, marster wouldn’ tell ‘em, but mother she hear him tellin’ mistus that the slaves was free but they didn’ know it and he’s not gwineter tell ‘em till he makes another crop or two. When mother hear that she say she slip out the chimney corner and crack her heels together four times and shouts, ‘I’s free, I’s free.’ Then she runs to the field, ‘gainst marster’s will and tol’ all the other slaves and they quit work. Then she run away and in the night she slip into a big ravine near the house and have them bring me to her. Marster, he come out with his gun and shot at mother but she run down the ravine and gits away with me."

TEMPIE CUMMINS, who was born at Brookeland, Texas. At the time of her interview (between 1936 and 1938) she lived in Jasper, Texas.

Excerpt from the Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, Texas Narratives, Part 1; Work Projects Administration, Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Source: American Memory, Library of Congress

NEVER FORGET!

556 notes

active-rva:

Happy Juneteenth! This holiday marks the end of the official institution of slavery in the United States, and was historically widely celebrated by black Americans. The photo above is of a 1905 celebration in Richmond, Virginia. 
On this day in 1865, enslaved people in Texas were informed of their freedom, two years following the Emancipation Proclamation. Also on this day, the Civil Rights Act of 1963 was passed, after an 83 day filibuster in the US Senate. 

NEVER FORGET!!!

active-rva:

Happy Juneteenth! This holiday marks the end of the official institution of slavery in the United States, and was historically widely celebrated by black Americans. The photo above is of a 1905 celebration in Richmond, Virginia. 

On this day in 1865, enslaved people in Texas were informed of their freedom, two years following the Emancipation Proclamation. Also on this day, the Civil Rights Act of 1963 was passed, after an 83 day filibuster in the US Senate. 

NEVER FORGET!!!

21 notes

mypubliclands:

These trumpeter swans were MADE FOR EACH OTHER.
Did you know that swans often mate for life? They generally pick their mate sometime between two and three years of age. During their courtship, they may even appear to “kiss” bills.
-Krista Berumen

mypubliclands:

These trumpeter swans were MADE FOR EACH OTHER.

Did you know that swans often mate for life? They generally pick their mate sometime between two and three years of age. During their courtship, they may even appear to “kiss” bills.

-Krista Berumen